YouTube Subtitles And Closed Captions: Go Global


Let’s learn about YouTube subtitles and closed captions.

YouTube has grown from a small video sharing website into the global marketing juggernaut it is today, and that’s by appealing to massive audiences. Your TGN partnered channel can tap into this global audience by using YouTube subtitles and closed captions on your videos.

Using YouTube subtitles and closed captions will help you expand your audience into those who may speak a different language than you, or those who may be hearing impaired. Are you noticing a quarter of your monthly views come from Brazil? Why not put Portuguese subtitles on your videos?

Sharing is caring, my friends, and you want to share your awesome content with YouTube subtitles and closed captions on your videos.

 

Closed Captioning Is Easy

In fact, it’s so easy it’s kind of sad that most people don’t do it on their videos, and miss an audience full of viewers who may not necessarily be able to hear the audio, and need closed-captioning. Fun fact: the closed captions are in the specified language of the video, so make sure you’ve got the right language.

You can upload your own closed captioning if you want, or YouTube can totally help you make them for your video. You have a couple of options using YouTube’s tools to create closed captions. The first option is to create your own and use YouTube’s transcribe and sync tool. You can either type into the box, or copy/pasta the video transcript into the box then click the sync button.

 

YouTube Subtitles And Closed Captions: Go Global
Make sure to double check or you could end up like this!

 

The second option is to use YouTube’s auto-captions feature and then edit what it spits out. Sometimes it’s right, sometime’s it’s wrong. Just check to make sure it isn’t ridiculous and you end up as a funny caption fail gif. After you’ve finished creating and adding captions, you can publish them in the Captions Tab. Seriously, it’s so simple.

 

Get Your Subtitles On

Subtitles are a bit more complicated than closed captioning, as they are generally written in a different language than the specified language on the video. This is easy if you know how to speak a second or third language. Not so easy if you’re like me, and can really only fumble my way through another language using Google Translate.

 

Once you’ve decided you want to

translate a video for a different language,

you have a few options on how to go about it.

 

Once you’ve decided you want to translate a video for a different language, you have a few options on how to go about it. The first of which is to translate the video yourself, but we already mentioned that. The second option is to ask the community you’ve got that speaks that language to translate it for you.

This third is a bit more unpredictable, but it can easily be done yourself. You can use the Automatic Translation feature on YouTube to translate your video. This, of course, has it’s accuracy issues, but it’s better than nothing.

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YouTube subtitles and closed captions are a powerful way to share your content with an even bigger audience of fans. Be sure to partner YouTube subtitles and closed captions with YouTube Analytics to see if there are languages you should be translating your content into!

Thanks for reading, TGN Partners, and we’ll be back next week!